Archive for the ‘Windows 10’ Category

100’s of Windows Commands

This is a must have pdf reference file: 

An amazing, free, current, searchable, compilation of hundreds Windows commands with explanations, syntax, and examples of their use.  And, it’s free !

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=56846

Windows Commands

Windows 10 Update Fails error code 0xc1900208

It seems Windows 10 Update fails sometimes, especially with the Fall Creators Update.  It continuously wants to install, you approve, it runs, and fails, often with error code 0xc1900208.   

In troubleshooting I have found most of the time it will install if you click the “Update now” button form the Creators Update Web page.  It seems to check for compatibility, make any adjustments, then Install.https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10 

Should that fail to work, you can download the Windows 10 Update Troubleshooter, which will troubleshoot, and offer to repair any issues found.  There is also a troubleshooter for Win  7 and 8.https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4027322/windows-update-troubleshooter 

However, I also recently read about an issue with attached USB drives oddly causing the update to fail.  Recently,  on a PC on which I tried all of the aforementioned options, and had no attached USB devices, I discovered a DVD in the drive.  Once ejected the update installed without a problem.  This strikes me as very bizarre, but perhaps the update searches other available drives for some reason. 

Therefore; I recommend if having issues with Windows updates, try disconnecting any USB devices such as external drives, thumb drives, phones which may be charging, and possibly even USB printers, and don’t forget to check the DVD tray, just in case.

C:\Windows\Temp filling with .cab files

On several systems over the past year I have seen the C:\Windows\Temp folder filling up with large .cab files generated by the system, on a semi-regular bases.  This continues until there is no available drive space and the system becomes unusable.

The short term solution is to just delete all of the files but the problem returns after weeks or months, depending on the initial free drive space.

It seems this is caused by a large log file within the C:\Windows\Logs\CBS folder.  To resolve I created a folder C:\Windows\Logs\CBS_Archive and moved all  CbsPersist_file_number.log files, older than 10 days, to the archive folder.  This seems to have resolved the issue.

.NET 3.5 & .NET 2.0 on Win 10

There are numerous 3rd party applications that require .NET 3.5 and/or .NET 2.0 such as QuickBooks, Profile, and more.  Normally you simply go to: Control Panel, Programs and Features, Turn Windows Features On and Off, select .NET Framework 3.5 (includes .NET 2.0 and 3.0) and install.

image

However with Windows 10 it will want to “Download files from Windows Update” and then fail, primarily when joined to a domain that has WSUS (Windows Server Update Services) enabled, resulting in an Error code: 0x800F081F.

image

The problem also exists on Windows 8 and 8.1, with numerous suggestions to resolve including removing specific updates.  These updates do not exist on Win 10, but if they relate to your problem see: http://www.askvg.com/fix-0x800f0906-and-0x800f081f-error-messages-while-installing-net-framework-3-5-in-windows-8/

To give credit where credit is due, Microsoft’s solutions to the Windows 10 problem are outlined in the following article: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/2734782

From that I was able to resolve using the following steps. :

  • Attach a Windows 10 install ISO, either by inserting the install CD, USB, or a path to an ISO file on the network.  The latter can be achieved by using the USB/ISO creation tool which downloads the files from Microsoft and creates the ISO from Microsoft: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10
  • If you are using an ISO file you can mount it so that it can be accessed using a drive letter within Windows 8/10 by highlighting the ISO file and choose manage then mount, from the menu bar in Windows Explorer.
  • Edit local group policy to look for your ISO when Microsoft Update cannot be accessed.  Open group Policy by entering  gpedit.msc  in the search box or from an elevated command line.
  • Locate the following policy: Computer Configuration | Administrative Templates | System
  • In the right hand window, scroll down past the folders and locate the specific policy: “Specify settings for optional component installation and component repair”.
  • image
  • Double click on the policy to open it, click the radio button “Enable”, and in the box “Alternate source path” enter the path to the necessary files.  They are located in the \sources\sxs folder of the ISO.  In my case this would be E:\sources\sxs
  • Note: there is an option in the policy to “contact Windows Update directly” but this did not work for me or others.
  • Force group policy to update by rebooting or from an elevated command prompt enter   gpupdate  /force
  • Now you can return to: Control Panel, Programs and Features, Turn Windows Features On and Off, select “.NET Framework 3.5 (includes .NET 2.0 and 3.0)” and install.  It should locate the files and install without a problem.
  • I recommend a reboot after doing so.
NOTE:  WINDOWS 10

–  I recently had difficulties applying this method to a Windows 10 machine.  I believe it may be related to it being an upgrade from 8.1, but I had to download the Windows 10 trial .ISO file from TechNet, mount it, and run the following command from an elevated command prompt.  (Substitute your drive letter for ‘D:’, and path if necessary)

dism /online /add-package /packagepath:E:\sources\sxs\microsoft-windows-netfx3-ondemand-package.cab

Tag Cloud